Tuesday, 15 October 2013

Dodge-Durango

Dodge-Durango

The Dodge Durango is a sport utility vehicle (SUV) produced by the Dodge division of Chrysler. The first two generations were very similar in that both were based on the Dodge Dakota, both featured a body-on-frame construction and both were produced at the Newark Assembly plant in Newark, Delaware. However, they did differ in that the first generation was classified as a mid-size SUV while, the second generation was classified as a full-size SUV.

 The third generation Durango however is built on the same platform as the Jeep Grand Cherokee, features unibody construction and is currently being assembled at the Jefferson North Assembly plant in Detroit, Michigan. However, it does retain the previous generation's classification as a full-size SUV.


The Durango was marketed as a sturdy truck-based SUV designed to hold up to eight passengers and tow up to 8,950 lb (4,060 kg) when properly equipped. The 4.7 L PowerTech V8 replaced the 5.2 L Magnum V8 engine for 2000; however, the 5.2 was still available in the early 2000 models. In that same year a special AWD performance version called the R/T was released with a 5.9 L Magnum V8. In 1999 and 2000, a limited edition Shelby S.P.360 version was offered that featured a supercharged version of the 5.9 L Magnum V8 engine. Output is 360 hp (270 kW; 360 PS) and 412 lb·ft (559 N·m) of torque. Exterior modifications include unique wheels, tires, suspension, and bumpers. It came standard with Viper blue paint with two racing stripes down the center of the truck. It boasted a 0 to 60 mph time of 7.1 seconds. The top speed was 142 mph (229 km/h).
1998: First model year for Durango, available only in 4WD.
1999: The Durango was made available with 2WD. A 3.9L Magnum V6 engine was available, however few were sold. Minor changes were made for the 2nd year, two new paint colors and notable options available including 6 in × 9 in (150 mm × 230 mm) heated rear view mirrors and steering wheel-mounted radio controls. Leather seats became standard on SLT Plus models, and body-color wheel flares became standard on SLT Plus and 4WD Models.


 2001: Dodge focused on interior upgrades as Durango's interior trim panels, dash mounted controls, instrument panel, overhead console, and steering wheel were all redesigned. The transfer case selector on 4X4 models changed from a manual lever on the console to a switch on the dash. The instrument cluster was updated and an electronic vehicle information center (EVIC) was incorporated into the overhead console. For improved rear passenger comfort, a dual-zone climate control system was added as standard equipment. Sound systems were improved on all models and now came standard with SX speakers. Other minor changes include door panels, revised seats, aluminium wheels, and minor changes to trim options.


The second generation Durango was first shown as a concept dubbed Dodge Durango R/T concept at the 2003 Detroit Auto Show. It debuted shortly before the companion Dakota. Like the Dakota, it has much in common with the large Dodge Ram pickup, including a fully boxed frame. It is 7 in (180 mm) longer, 2 in (51 mm) wider, and 3 in (76 mm) taller than the previous model. It also offered a third row bench with three seats, giving it an eight-seat capacity. The design took its styling primarily from the Dodge Powerbox concept, which was itself based on the 1999 Dodge Power Wagon Concept, and the 2003 Durango R/T concept.
Debuting for 2004 was a new coil-spring rear suspension and a solid rear axle. A Watt linkage system is fitted to the rear axle, centering the axle and reducing rear-end skate over rough surfaces, and allowing a lower and wider cargo floor.
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